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BAD DECISIONS: Shackles and Chains – (LIVESTREAM) (LIET01/22)

Event Description

Every choice has a consequence!  Even the best educated and informed professional can make choices (unethical choices) that can have a profound impact on their career and life.  

This program brings to life the practical way that smart people make dumb choices and what we can do, as professionals, to recognize and prevent unethical choices from happening.

Designed For

From Partner to staff – all accounting professionals will find this course informative and helpful – while achieving ethics credits

Objectives

So what will you, your people and your company get out of it all?

  • A positive, compelling message that everyone will listen to and remember.
  • A fresh perspective that will raise ethics awareness to a new level—reducing the likelihood of fraud and other unethical behaviors that put your business at risk.
  • The motivation to make ethical choices that will lead to long-term success and profitability.
  • Valuable insight to help you develop an effective ethics program (or make your existing program more effective).

Major Subjects

In 1987, at the height of his career, Chuck Gallagher made some bad choices. He went from wearing a business suit to an orange jump suit. So…you might be asking yourself, Why would I want a former convicted felon to speak to my organization about ethics and integrity? Why? Because Chuck has experienced firsthand how easy it is to move from ethical to unethical. Having rebuilt his life — the lessons Chuck learned allow him to share a unique perspective unlike any other business ethics keynote speaker. Rather than taking the usual theoretical approach that most business ethics speakers take—which, frankly, can put an audience to sleep—Chuck captures attention by talking about his own journey from a human perspective, then combining it with a practical application. His presentations are sometimes humorous, often thought-provoking and always impactful—but never “textbook.”